Tips For Chapter 13 And Chapter 7 Personal Bankruptcy And Property

In this economy, we cannot fault the high numbers of people filing for personal bankruptcy. There used to be a stigma attached to filing, but that has long since passed. For many, filing for personal bankruptcy is the only way to carry on, the only way to exist. The following article will offer you some tips on how to accept and proceed with the circumstances of personal bankruptcy.

Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you need to go over your finances and do your best to come up with a manageable budget. You want to do this so that you will not end up so deep in debt again that you will have to file for bankruptcy, again.



Make sure you have a solid understanding of which debts can be eliminated by bankruptcy, and which ones cannot. Debts like student loans, child support or alimony payments, and taxes, are generally not discharged through bankruptcy. Bankruptcy can help if your wages are being garnished or if you have large unsecured debts, like, credit cards and utility bills.

Don't put off bankruptcy forever. You might be better off filing early rather than juggling your debt for years. If you aren't sure what to do, search for a nonprofit agency that helps consumers navigate bankruptcy. These experts can advise you about the best time to file and can share information about what to expect. Many of these agencies provide classes or workshops about managing credit as well.

Know your rights when it comes to filing for personal bankruptcy. The last thing you need now, is a hassle from the legal professional that you hire to represent you. A few years ago, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act was made into law, in order to protect financially strapped consumers from being ripped off. Beware and be informed!


If you have filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but realize that you are unable to meet your payment obligations, you may be able to convert to a Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. To qualify for the conversion, you must never have converted your bankruptcy before and also undergo a financial evaluation. The laws surrounding this process are always changing, so be sure to talk with an attorney who can help you navigate this process.

If you lose your job, or otherwise face a financial crisis after filing Chapter 13, contact your trustee immediately. If you don't pay your Chapter 13 payment on time, your trustee can request that your bankruptcy be dismissed. You may need to modify your Chapter 13 plan if, you are unable to pay the agreed-upon amount.

Before you decide to file for bankruptcy, be sure to obtain a free consultation with a bankruptcy attorney. Depending on where you live, you have the right to speak to an attorney before filing. Any good attorney will offer a first appointment free. This is an important consultation, as you will need the answers to many questions. These may include: attorney fees, what type of bankruptcy to file, and what types of information, paperwork you will need to provide. Most importantly, an attorney will be able to determine if filing for bankruptcy is the right decision for you.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

Never use a paralegal to guide you through the bankruptcy process. While some paralegals may have the necessary knowledge to provide all the answers you need, they cannot give legal advice legally. Because of this, you are not guaranteed in any way to receive accurate information or advice. An attorney, on the other hand, has a legal and ethical obligation to provide you with accurate information and sound advice.

Be selective. you could try these out may have learned that you must continue to pay for auto and home loans, and to stop paying your credit card bills immediately. That money could be put to much better use somewhere else. Continuing payments on these accounts is wasted money. Apply it to the lines of credit that you plan to keep.

Do not make webpage of running up lots of new debt just prior to filing for bankruptcy. The court will take all of your spending into account, including recent debts you've incurred, and the judge may not be willing to waive debts if it appears that you are trying to game the system. Make sure that your spending habits reflect a true desire to change.

Make sure you act at an appropriate time. Timing is critical, particularly when it comes to filing for bankruptcy. There are situations in which it is in your best interest to file immediately, but other times it is advisable to wait. Discuss the strategic timing of your bankruptcy with your attorney.

Don't overly concern yourself with any negative feelings you are having. It is possible for those going through the bankruptcy process to feel unworthy, guilty or ashamed. These feelings, however, are of no benefit to anyone, and they can be detrimental to your mental health. Having the right outlook during a tough financial upheaval is a great attitude in coping with bankruptcy.

If you are planning to file bankruptcy, avoid taking large cash advances from credit cards thinking that the debt will be erased. This fraudulent practice is a demonstration of bad faith. Debts you incur this way will likely not be discharged in a bankruptcy, and you will still have to repay them.

Stop using your credit card. If you are filing for bankruptcy, refrain from using your credit card a few months in advance. A court will, generally, frown upon any frivolous charges showing up on your personal bank statements. Try to keep in mind how your bank activity will appear to a judge.

You will most likely need to consult with a lawyer who specializes in the field of bankruptcy prior to filing. Be diligent in your research before you hire someone to represent you. Check all public records available on your attorney and make sure he or she is properly licensed and has excellent references. You should visit with several lawyers and examine what payment structures they offer based on what type of results. You should not hire anyone who makes you feel uncomfortable with them.

Hopefully, you have learned what you need to know about personal bankruptcy. The advice that has been gathered into this article is meant to help you make the right choices when the time comes to file or to help you decide if it is the right move for you to make. Use this as a guide to help decide.

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